A new Taiwanese university system begins to take shape amid major societal shifts

Interview with Da Hsuan Feng, National Tsing Hua University

COLLABORATION | Volume 1, Issue 1 – 2011

The Academic Executive Brief interviews Da Hsuan Feng about the formation of the University System of Taiwan. People in Taiwan realized that merging the four universities would be virtually impossible because of the extremely competitive climate within Taiwanese higher education. Instead, another model was proposed to achieve some sort of commonality for competing not only nationally, but globally.

The unfolding science of science and innovation policy

By Joshua Rosenbloom, National Science Foundation

Research ROI | Volume 3, Issue 1 – 2013

Measuring the economic benefits of investments in R&D requires tracing a complex web of influences over periods of several decades. A community of practice centered on key issues in science and innovation policy has emerged in support of drivers to place policy decisions on a sound scientific basis. Only through a sustained and systematic study of this subject will we improve our understanding of the key issues that motivated the call for a Science of Science Policy.

Meeting our research goal by recruiting and advancing talented researchers

By Jiecai Han and Xiaohong Wang, Harbin Institute of Technology

Researcher mobility | Volume 4, Issue 2 – 2014

To survive the fierce competition for scholars in China, HIT decided to bring talented researchers from abroad to HIT for initiation and fusion of disciplines, and to cultivate talented researchers by having them spend time abroad to open their academic field of view and to go further with their careers.

Eye on America: Working with and within a winner-take-all competitive system

By Brad Fenwick, University of Tennessee, Knoxville

COLLABORATION | Volume 1, Issue 1 – 2011

In the winner-take-all system, everyone pays to compete but only one person walks away with the prize. In the competition for grants and contracts, the investment in infrastructure is enormous if you want to remain competitive. As the cost of winning goes up, the resources become scarcer, the prizes become more precious, and the bidding rises. It is increasingly clear that the focus must be on the development of systems that enhance institutional productivity and effectiveness.

Evidence-based decision making in academic research: The “Snowball” effect

By John T. Green, Fellow of Queens’ College, University of Cambridge

Research ROI | Volume 3, Issue 1 – 2013

John Green's interest in research metrics grew in concert with the UK’s downturn in higher education funding, when it became increasingly apparent that the academic research enterprise required the application of business principles in order to survive and thrive. He later became involved in developing Snowball Metrics, an agreed set of robust and consistent definitions for tried-and tested metrics across the entire spectrum of research activities.

Pioneering novel approaches to science and technology in Japan

By Michiharu Nakamura, Japan Science and Technology Agency

Investing in impact | Volume 5, Issue 1 – 2015

Over its history, the Japan Science and Technology Agency has nurtured its own distinct competencies, alongside a robust network of universities and private enterprises. By analyzing the S&T landscape around the world, JST can make proposals throughout Japan on high-impact research areas and subjects that should be addressed.

Global scientific collaboration and global problems

By Chris Llewellyn Smith, University of Oxford

COLLABORATION | Volume 1, Issue 1 – 2011

The global scientific landscape has changed dramatically in the last two decades. Since the beginning of the century, global spending on research and development has nearly doubled, and the number of scientific publications has grown by almost a third. This article, based on the Royal Society's "Knowledge, networks and nations: Global scientific collaboration in the 21st century," describes changes in the global scientific scene and analyses their implications.

New FundRef initiative makes R&D investments more transparent

By David Kross, Elsevier

Research is big business. But identifying return on investment is not easy for research funders. While publishers almost always include an acknowledgements section in their journals, where authors credit their funding sources, the lack of standardization of funding organizations’ names and their abbreviations make it difficult to use the information for reporting or analysis. Several funding bodies and publishers are now collaborating with CrossRef to address this problem.

Picodiagnostics: a success story from the southern capital of Russia

By Alexander Soldatov, Southern Federal University

Investing in impact | Volume 5, Issue 1 – 2015

Synergy between the traditional Russian route for development of a research laboratory in the form of a scientific school and extensive international mobility for researchers led to the remarkable growth and development of Southern Federal University's International Research Center for Smart Materials.

Eye on Mexico: Public support for science is high, but transition to a research-based economy remains the challenge

By Edmundo A. Gutiérrez-D., National Institute for Astrophysics, Optics and Electronics, Mexico

RESEARCH AND PUBLIC OPINION | Volume 1, Issue 2 – 2011

Most Mexican companies are oriented towards low-tech production and commercialization of imported goods, while the government is steering the research community, through the evaluation process, towards an international qualification level, which is not correlated with the country’s current industrial needs. This disconnect is hindering the transition toward a more technology-oriented base economy. There is an urgent need to build confidence in the joint university-industry relationship and to reorient high-skilled human resources to meet Mexico’s industrial and technology needs.

Tackling grand challenges: Boosting interdisciplinarity to embrace complexity, unknowns and imperfection

By Gabriele Bammer, The Australian National University

Interdisciplinary Research | Volume 3, Issue 2 – 2013

For a team-based interdisciplinary effort to successfully address complex, real-world grand challenges, we need to boost our problem-solving skill sets. In addition to reductionist thinking, which gives us detailed understanding of specific elements of the problem, we need to enhance our ability to also understand the problem as a system. This involves understanding interconnections, possible vicious or stabilizing cycles, simple rules that may underpin complex behaviors, properties that emerge when the focus moves from one level in a hierarchy to another, and so on.

Swimming against the current to fund foundational science

By Miyoung Chun, The Kavli Foundation

Investing in impact | Volume 5, Issue 1 – 2015

The Kavli Foundation has carved out strategic positions as a catalyzer in well-established centers of science and as a leader in identifying and developing new niche areas of science in a timely way. Kavli Institutes are structured to enable a level of independent inquiry lacking in funding from other sources.

Drivers and benefits of research policy and information systems within the UK

By Scott Rutherford, Queen's University Belfast

RESEARCH AND PUBLIC OPINION | Volume 1, Issue 2 – 2011

It is no surprise that the need for research information comes from both internal and external drivers. Perhaps the most important external driver for information within the UK context is the Research Excellence Framework (REF), an initiative of the four UK higher education funding bodies to assess the performance of UK researchers.

Creating cross-culturally competent leaders for global teams

By Norhayati Zakaria, Universiti Utara Malaysia

Interdisciplinary Research | Volume 3, Issue 2 – 2013

With the globalization of research teams, institutions are increasingly paying attention to the interconnections between management competencies and culture. Whether the team is together in one physical location or operates in a virtual environment, challenges can arise from many sources: cultural, managerial, operational, efficiency or effectiveness concerns, and more.

The increasing velocity of S&T in the State of Rio de Janeiro

By Dr. Jerson L. Silva, FAPERJ and Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

Investing in impact | Volume 5, Issue 1 – 2015

The State of Rio de Janeiro funding agency FAPERJ has achieved its most significant growth over the last 15 years and consolidated efforts as an important funder of science, technology and innovation. As a result, the State’s scientific output has improved in quantity and quality over recent years.

Sharing its story: UC San Diego brings home its global reputation for research excellence

Interview with Marye Anne Fox, UC San Diego

RESEARCH AND PUBLIC OPINION | Volume 1, Issue 2 – 2011

Chancellor Fox discusses the University of California, San Diego's global reputation/regional impact, funding successes and challenges, and the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine. "It’s a challenge to manage public opinion when a large part of the public may not understand the difference between an operating budget and a capital budget."

Genomics era gives rise to new breed of complex, cross-cutting projects

Interview with Mary Ellen Perry, NIH, and George Weinstock, WUSTL

Interdisciplinary Research | Volume 3, Issue 2 – 2013

Hundreds of researchers and multiple academic institutions and NIH institutes participated in the Human Microbiome Project (HMP) to sequence and analyze microbial genomes, create resource repositories, and examine the associated ethical, legal and social implications. The NIH Common Fund supported the HMP as its goals spanned the missions of several NIH Institutes and Centers.

In the wake of 3-11, Japanese academics must further increase understanding of and interest in science and technology in Japan

By Yoichiro Matsumoto, The University of Tokyo

RESEARCH AND PUBLIC OPINION | Volume 1, Issue 2 – 2011

Before the triple disaster — earthquake, tsunami and nuclear accident — of March 11, 2011 (3-11), struck Japan, our faculty members within science and technology (S&T) were already under pressure. Historically, professors have been accorded much respect in Japan, and the academic freedom offered at universities presented a desirable career option. However, changing attitudes and conditions have tempered benefits and diminished the pool of next-generation aspirants.

Cross-border feats: Singapore’s Nanyang Technological University is breaking boundaries in Asia

By Bertil Andersson and Tony Mayer, Nanyang Technological University

Interdisciplinary Research | Volume 3, Issue 2 – 2013

By changing mind-sets and creating new interactions, we can open universities to new ways of working and generate excitement about interdisciplinary possibilities. Young institutions such as Nanyang Technological University may have advantages in this realm; their structures are not as constrained as those of older institutions. By promoting interdisciplinarity within a Humboldtian ethos, combining research and education, young institutions can be at the forefront of change.

Why scientists don't share and why they should

By Andrew Plume, Elsevier

COLLABORATION | Volume 1, Issue 1 – 2011

Historically, studies have shown and continue to demonstrate that researchers desire to disseminate information and further knowledge within their disciplines. But they are also fundamentally human and susceptible to the drivers that motivate us all, including advancement and competition.

Challenge accepted – Japan’s AIMR champions mathematical integration to afford infinite possibilities

By Motoko Kotani, Tohoku University

Interdisciplinary Research | Volume 3, Issue 2 – 2013

In the 21st century, materials science seems to be at a turning point, changing into a more exact science based on fundamental principles and prediction. AIMR is playing a leading role by gathering top international researchers from various backgrounds and developing interdisciplinary research in a supportive environment.

Ambitious and agile: The University of Bremen’s institutional strategy for advancing research strengths at a mid-sized university

By Rolf Drechsler and Achim Wiesner, University of Bremen

TEAM SCIENCE | Volume 2, Issue 2 – 2012

The University of Bremen produces internationally competitive research, ranking especially high in volume of third-party funding for that research. Bremen has been notably boosted in its development by its capacity for internal cooperation and communication.

Shaping our future: The University of Birmingham’s challenge to attain research excellence

By Adam Tickell, University of Birmingham

During the past 15 years or so, the University of Birmingham progressively slipped according to the UK’s research evaluation measures. Under the leadership of a new Vice Chancellor, Professor David Eastwood, the university went through an ambitious transformation to achieve its goal of becoming a leading global university.

Guidance for team science leaders: Tools you can use

By Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, Elsevier

TEAM SCIENCE | Volume 2, Issue 2 – 2012

The author explores recent findings about team assembly and composition, as well as trust and communication, and offers related tools leaders can use to implement effective practices in team science.

From conception to reinvention: KAIST advances Korean economic development

By Byoung Yoon Kim and Sung-Mo “Steve” Kang, KAIST

Academic research and economic development | Volume 4, Issue 1 – 2014

For the new economy, KAIST is recharging itself to educate future entrepreneurs and to create an ecosystem for world-class technology startups. It is planning new programs for entrepreneurship education and adding the supporting infrastructure, while strengthening basic R&D activities to sustain creativity and innovation.