We invite you to browse our gallery of infographics from various issues. To view image details, highlight the image and click on the blue expand button. You can then browse the full gallery in this larger format. The images include those featured on our back cover in The Graphical View and a selection of article images.

  • Research volume and impact by discipline, 2009-2013

    The radar chart is rich in information about the global trends in various disciplines. The larger the area of the slice, the greater the publication volume. Longer slices mean more citations per paper as shown in immunology and microbiology. And the color indicates the compound annual growth rate of publications from 2009-2013. For example, biochemistry, genetics and molecular biology grew the fastest among all subject areas. (Source: Scopus, SciVal)

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    A global view of research volume and impact by discipline, 2009-2013

  • Academic publications per million $ R&D for US states

    Publications by the academic sector per million $ US research and development for US states, in 2013 dollars from 2004 to 2013. (Source: Scopus and NSF Higher Education Research and Development Survey). This map was included in America's Knowledge Economy, a report by Elsevier Analytical Services and the Council of State Governments that examines the comparative research strengths of US states.

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    Publications by the academic sector per million $ US research and development for US states, in 2013 dollars from 2004 to 2013

  • Top Russian institutions in condensed matter physics

    The larger the bubble, the greater the field-weighted citation impact of an institution’s output. The color is an indicator of the average number of views per publication (darker = more views), which is based on research usage metrics from Elsevier’s ScienceDirect platform. For more information on how Elsevier calculates usage data, please see the Elsevier Research Intelligence Usage Guidebook - http://ow.ly/Kxz8d. (Source: Data from Scopus and ScienceDirect via SciVal)

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    The larger the bubble, the greater the field-weighted citation impact of an institution’s output

  • Institutional collaboration networks — iPS cells

    The Japan Science and Technology Agency was among the 30 most active institutions with more than 2 coauthored publications in embryonic stem cell research during the 2008-2012 period. This visualization from the 2013 Stem Cell Research report (http://ow.ly/LS2IF) shows the collaboration networks. Node size represents volume of embryonic stem cell publications, the thickness of the lines represents the volume of co-publications between institutions and the color represents the region. (Source: 2013 Stem Cell Research Report, source data from Scopus)

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    This visualization from the 2013 Stem Cell Research report shows the collaboration networks

  • Nanoscience and nanotechnology at Cornell University

    The map above shows nanoscience and nanotechnology at Cornell University, where there is a Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science. The research area was defined as all publications associated with the top 30 journals (based on SCImago Journal Rank or SJR) in 2013 in the area of nanoscience and nanotechnology and includes journals such as Nature Nanotechnology, Nano Letters, Advanced Materials, Nano Today, and ACS Nano (http://www.scimagojr.com/ journalrank.php). The size of the bubbles corresponds to the total number of publications by the respective institution from 2010–2014, while the color (light to dark) corresponds to the field-weighted citation impact of those publications. (Source: Data from Scopus via SciVal)

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    The map above shows nanoscience and nanotechnology at Cornell University, where there is a Kavli Institute at Cornell for Nanoscale Science

  • Nanoscience and nanotechnology at Delft University of Technology

    The map above shows nanoscience and nanotechnology at Delft University of Technology, where there is a Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at Delft University of Technology. The research area was defined as all publications associated with the top 30 journals (based on SCImago Journal Rank or SJR) in 2013 in the area of nanoscience and nanotechnology and includes journals such as Nature Nanotechnology, Nano Letters, Advanced Materials, Nano Today, and ACS Nano (http://www.scimagojr.com/ journalrank.php). The size of the bubbles corresponds to the total number of publications by the respective institution from 2010–2014, while the color (light to dark) corresponds to the field-weighted citation impact of those publications. (Source: Data from Scopus via SciVal)

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    The map above shows nanoscience and nanotechnology at Delft University of Technology, where there is a Kavli Institute of Nanoscience at Delft University of Technology

  • Publication growth at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

    The bar chart shows across the board growth in number of publications from 2005–2009 to 2010–2014 in the top 16 subject areas at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro, the largest and top ranked university in the State of Rio de Janeiro. Within Physics and Astronomy, international collaboration as a percentage of total research rose from 46.5% to 56.0% over the same period, a much higher rate of increase than that for international collaborations across all subject areas (27.7% to 30.8%). This contributed to a spike in field weighed citation impact (FWCI) from 1.12 to 1.67. (Source: Scopus)

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    The bar chart shows across the board growth in number of publications from 2005–2009 to 2010–2014 in the top 16 subject areas at the Federal University of Rio de Janeiro

  • Germany’s top 30 co-authorship country partnerships, 2008-2012

    After normalizing for each partner country’s total output (using Salton’s index), Germany’s top collaborators are Switzerland (CHE), Austria (AUT), the United Kingdom (UK), the Netherlands (NLD), and the United States (USA). For more detailed information, view Figure 5.5 (p. 65) of the International Comparative Performance of the UK Research Base – 2013 report at www.elsevier.com/ online-tools/research-intelligence/ research-initiatives/BIS2013.

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    Germany’s top 30 co-authorship country partnerships, 2008-2012

  • German, European and US researcher mobility classes, 1996-2011

    Outputs include articles, reviews and conference papers indexed in sources covered by Scopus. Mobility classes are inferred by the pattern of country affiliation changes over time. Bubbles reflect the proportion of active researchers in each mobility class and do not add up to 100% owing to the exclusion of researchers exhibiting patterns of transitory mobility. (Source: Adapted from Figure 22 (p. 31) of Comparative Benchmarking of European and US Research Collaboration and Research Mobility, a 2013 report by Science Europe and Elsevier, www.elsevier.com/online-tools/research-intelligence/research-initiatives/science-europe.)

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    German, European and US researcher mobility classes, 1996-2011

  • Which academic disciplines in China are the least mobile?

    Comparison of the percentage of sedentary and transitory (mainly non-China) researchers among total active researchers. Bubble size denotes the number of active researchers. (Source: Data from Scopus, 1996-2013.)

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    Which academic disciplines in China are the least mobile?

  • Researcher mobility model of China’s research base

    The high percentage of sedentary researchers in China, coupled with transitory (specifically mainly non-China based) researchers producing impactful publications, points to China’s development into a significant research and development country. Its relatively young research base is complemented, and possibly led, by international researchers of high seniority and mobility. Meanwhile, researchers in smaller subject areas are taking the lead in interacting with the international community through higher levels of mobility. (Data from Scopus, 1996-2013.)

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    Researcher mobility model of China’s research base

  • Programs launched across China in recent years to bring in talented researchers

    This map shows various talented researchers recruiting programs that were launched in different Chinese provinces and regions to bring in talented researchers from abroad to satisfy their research needs. (Source: Talent Work Communication, issue 110)

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    Programs launched across China in recent years to bring in talented researchers

  • Rising influence of HIT’s internationally generated papers over the past 10 years

    As shown in the figure, the number of Harbin Institute of Technology (HIT) papers resulting from international cooperation is increasing steadily, while their international academic influence is also increasing; this indicates the far-reaching significance of the scientific achievements of HIT made by bringing in — and advancing — talented researchers in the past. (Source: Scopus)

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    Rising influence of HIT’s internationally generated papers over the past 10 years

  • Global map of Princeton’s top 50 international collaborators by number of co-authorships, 2009-2013

    Node size is proportional to the number of co-authors at the collaborating institution and node color is the number of co-authorships. (Source: Data on collaborations from SciVal.)

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    Global map of Princeton’s top 50 international collaborators by number of co-authorships, 2009-2013

  • Researcher mobility model of Nigeria’s research base

    The main takeaway from Nigeria’s researcher mobility model is that across all categories of researchers, transitory (mainly non-Nigerian) researchers, such as visiting researchers, are the most productive in terms of research output, and their publications have the highest citation impact, as measured by the field-weighted citation impact (FWCI) indicator. (Data from Scopus, 1996-2013)

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    Researcher mobility model of Nigeria’s research base

  • Scientific impact and patents of 11 global economies

    FWCI is the ratio of total citations actually received by the denominator’s output, and the total citations that would be expected based on the average of the subject field. Bubble size corresponds to 2007-2011 publication output. (Source: SciVal visualization using data from Scopus and the WIPO).

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    Bubble size corresponds to 2007-2011 publication output.

  • Complementary academic and industry competencies

    The circle maps demonstrate how the academic research institution can complement local industry. Abbott Laboratories is a global health company with headquarters in North Chicago. (Source: SciVal visualization using Scopus data)

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    Complementary academic and industry competencies

  • KAIST collaboration with Samsung

    Co-authored publications from 2009-2013 by journal category. (Source: SciVal)

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    Co-authored publications from 2009-2013 by journal category

  • The Startup KAIST movement

    A new “Startup KAIST” movement aims to nurture an entrepreneurial culture, create an ecosystem for startups, and promote go-global strategies. (Source: KAIST)

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    The Startup KAIST movement

  • Lund University academic and corporate collaboration

    Percentage of academic-corporate articles published at Lund University versus the world average. (Source: SciVal)

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    Percentage of academic-corporate articles published at Lund University versus the world average

  • Publication output of Lund University by amount of co-authorship

    The chart depicts the publication output of Lund University by amount of co-authorship, including international, national, and institutional collaboration (Source: SciVal)

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    Publication output of Lund University by amount of co-authorship

  • Growth in human microbiome publication diversity

    Using a keyword search of “human microbiome,” the figure shows a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 28% for journal category expansion, and 69% for number of publications between 2008–2012. (Source: SciVal custom analysis)

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    Growth in human microbiome publication diversity

  • A portrait of interdisciplinarity at Nanyang Technological University

    The location of each circle is determined by the primary subject area of that competency. Circles closer to the center are more interdisciplinary. (Source: SciVal visualization using Scopus data)

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    A portrait of interdisciplinarity at Nanyang Technological University

  • Impact: Subject-specific versus general subject area journals

    Field-Weighted Citation Impact (FWCI) takes into account the differences in research behavior across disciplines. General subject area journals, comprising research articles from many disciplines, clearly demonstrate a higher FWCI.

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    Impact: Subject-specific versus general subject area journals

  • The stages of Singapore’s economic development

    Singapore has embraced a knowledge-based economic model and made huge investments in research, much of which has been directed toward universities. (Chart source: STEP 2015, Agency for Science, Technology and Research - A*STAR)

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    The stages of Singapore’s economic development

  • Progress in interdisciplinary fusion at AIMR

    The Advanced Institute for Materials Research (AIMR) at Tohoku University has an original framework for promoting interdisciplinary research, the Fusion Research Proposal Program. To promote collaborations with mathematical viewpoints, AIMR set up “target projects” in 2012, which encouraged interdisciplinary teams through a unique organization called the Interface Unit. (Source: AIMR, Tohoku University)

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    Progress in interdisciplinary fusion at AIMR

  • Research efficiency of the top 20 countries*

    This chart indicates the research efficiency of the top 20 countries (*based on citations), in terms of citations, GERD PPP and population. Countries in the top half of the chart demonstrate greater research efficiency in terms of citations per dollar spent, while those in the upper right demonstrate greater efficiencies in terms of population as well. Source: Citations based on Scopus data. GERD PPP is gross expenditures on R&D adjusted for purchasing power parity, a forecast that includes both government and industrial expenditures, from Battelle Global R&D Funding Report 2013. Population is based on World Bank data.

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    Research efficiency of the top 20 countries*

  • Radar chart with key input and output indicators

    Indicators are for the innovation system of selected countries normalized to the number of researchers in the country. As can be seen, UK scores well on academic output, whereas Japan scores well on patenting. Sources: Data from OECD MSTI, WIPO statistics database, SciVal Spotlight and Scopus. Details available in online article.

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    Radar chart with key input and output indicators

  • Snowball Metrics - Income Volume at university level

    The university project partners tested their ability to all generate Snowball Metrics according to a single method for benchmarking, regardless of their different research information management systems, via a tool built by Elsevier, a Snowball Metrics project partner. This screenshot on the shows Income Volume at university level. Click the arrows in The Graphical Viewer to see the screenshot showing the same metric at the level of a discipline within the universities and focused on a particular type of funder: “UK industry, commerce & public corporations.” The colors belong to the same university in each screenshot. Note the differences in the lines.

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    Snowball Metrics - Income Volume at university level

  • Snowball Metrics - Income Volume at discipline level

    The university project partners tested their ability to all generate Snowball Metrics according to a single method for benchmarking, regardless of their different research information management systems, via a tool built by Elsevier, a Snowball Metrics project partner. The preceding screenshot shows Income Volume at university level (click the arrows in The Graphical Viewer to see it). This screenshot shows the same metric at the level of a discipline within the universities and focused on a particular type of funder: “UK industry, commerce & public corporations.” The colors belong to the same university in each screenshot. Note the differences in the lines.

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    Snowball Metrics - Income Volume at discipline level

  • Internal co-authorship research network for Dr. Amy Paller, Northwestern University

    Dr. Paller is the Walter J. Hamlin Professor and Chair of Dermatology and Professor of Pediatrics at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine and author of more than 350 publications. Source: Visualization from Northwestern Scholars using SciVal Experts with Scopus data. Circles represent individual researchers and the lines connecting them represent papers published together. Larger line = more collaborations; larger circle = more publications.

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    Internal co-authorship research network for Dr. Amy Paller, Northwestern University

  • Malaysia's publication output growth rate tops global list

    Currently, Malaysia is recognized for achieving the world’s fastest growth rate in numbers of journal publications (Source: Scopus and SciVal Spotlight). A continuing positive trend indicates that this phenomenal growth may be sustained for the next few years.

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    Malaysia's publication output growth rate tops global list

  • Linked data cloud

    VIVO enables authoritative data about researchers to become part of the Linked Data cloud.

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    VIVO enables authoritative data about researchers to become part of the Linked Data cloud.

  • Internal co-authorship research network for Teresa Woodruff, Northwestern University

    Teresa K. Woodruff is the Thomas J. Watkins Professor of Obstetrics & Gynecology, Feinberg School of Medicine and Professor of Molecular Biosciences, Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. She is Chief of the newly created Division of Fertility Preservation at the Feinberg School of Medicine, as well as the Vice Chair for Research in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology. Circles represent individual researchers, and the lines connecting them represent papers published together. Larger line = more collaborations; larger circle = more publications.

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    Internal co-authorship research network for Teresa Woodruff, Northwestern University

  • University of Hyderabad core competencies

    The location of each circle is determined by the primary subject area of that competency. Circles closer to the center are more interdisciplinary. SciVal Spotlight 2011 map (based on publication data from Scopus).

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    The location of each circle is determined by the primary subject area of that competency. Circles closer to the center are more interdisciplinary. SciVal Spotlight 2011 map (based on publication data from Scopus).

  • Global outmigration patterns from major research economies differ in significant ways

    The study uses Scopus author and affiliation profiles to analyze the authors’ outflow from a specific country to other countries. Source: SciVal Analytics using Scopus data from 1996–2010 based on analyzing the publications’ author mobility between countries.

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    Global outmigration patterns from major research economies differ in significant ways

  • International mobility of UK researchers, 1996-2010

    In 2011, the UK Department for Business, Innovation and Skills commissioned Elsevier to produce the International Comparative Performance of the UK Research Base: 2011. This infographic, based on Scopus data, appeared in the report. See page 21 and Appendix E of the report for information on methodology. Link to report: http://bit.ly/tPc31a.

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    International mobility of UK researchers, 1996-2010

  • International collaboration hubs

    On the left, the global map for the five-year period ending in 2000 shows that a small number of hubs dominate the collaboration network. On the right, the global map for the five-year period ending in 2008 shows how increasing collaboration has in turn increased the density of the network. Source: Scopus.

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    The changing density of international collaboration hubs

  • Growth in international collaboration for selected countries

    Growth in international collaboration for selected countries and the proportion of national output that this represents 1996–2008. From Knowledge, networks and nations: Global scientific collaboration in the 21st century (2011), The Royal Society.

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    Growth in international collaboration for selected countries and the proportion of national output that this represents 1996–2008

  • Citations per article versus number of collaborating countries

    When in need of complementary skills, researchers seek out the best collaborators, wherever they may be located, and the most appropriate facilities. This chart shows that international collaboration indeed leads to increased quality as measured by the number of times papers are cited. From Knowledge, networks and nations: Global scientific collaboration in the 21st century (2011), The Royal Society.

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    Citations per article versus number of collaborating countries

  • “Scientists’ statements are reliable” — Japan

    “Scientists’ statements are reliable” — Responses from the Japanese public before and after The Great Earthquake. Source: National Institute of Science and Technology Policy, Japan. The surveys were conducted via the Internet.

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    “Scientists’ statements are reliable” — Responses from the Japanese public before and after The Great Earthquake

  • Mexico article output and field weighted citation impact

    Source: SciVerse Scopus. The output graph shows publication data in terms of total articles published per year. The quality graph shows field weighted relative citation impact as a rolling measure: citations in year Y to articles from the two years before. The citation counts are corrected for the specific subject field that the article was published in so that they become comparable across disciplines.

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    Mexico article output and field weighted citation impact

  • Scientific evidence is

    Public Views on Scientific Evidence for Sense About Science (www.senseaboutscience.org), 2008 UK survey conducted by Ipsos MORI.

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    Public Views on Scientific Evidence for Sense About Science

  • Percentage of R&D funding at colleges and universities over time

    Public universities still have a mission of access and quality, but the means are changing. As states have continuously reduced their funding as shown in the chart, universities have turned to philanthropy, research, and raising tuition as different revenue streams. Source: National Science Foundation, Academic R&D Expenditures: FY 1953–2008.

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    Percentage of R&D funding at colleges and universities over time

  • Top 25 US institutions

    The table demonstrates that the top producers of academic research are growing at a faster and increasing rate in terms of numbers of citations and publications. Source: Scopus.

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    The top producers of academic research are growing at a faster and increasing rate in terms of numbers of citations and publications

  • The University System of Taiwan

    Maps highlighting the four institutions’ core competencies demonstrate common areas of strength (computer science, math, physics and engineering) and strategic differences, such as the medical specialties at National Yang-Ming University. Source: SciVal Spotlight 2009 maps (based on 2005-2009 publication data from Scopus).

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    Core competencies of the individual institutions comprising the University System of Taiwan

  • NIH R01 success rates dropped, while age of awardees increased

    Decreasing levels of institutional funding are a reality in many countries around the world, and the effect may be disproportional for early career researchers. From 2000 to 2008, success rates dropped (and not just due to increasing numbers of applicants) for the National Institutes of Health R01equivalent grants, while at the same time the average age of awardees increased. Source: Office of Research Information Systems, National Institutes of Health, fiscal years 2000–2009 (excludes awards made with American Recovery and Reinvestment Act Funds).

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    From 2000 to 2008, NIH R01equivalent grants' success rates dropped, while at the same time the average age of awardees increased

  • Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine - institutional core competencies

    Maps highlight the complementary competencies of the four institutions that make up the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine. SciVal Spotlight 2009 maps (based on 2005-2009 publication data from Scopus).

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    Maps highlight the complementary competencies of the four institutions that make up the Sanford Consortium for Regenerative Medicine