BRAIN CIRCULATION

The global movement of research talent

Volume 2, Issue 1 – 2012

This issue of The Academic Executive Brief explores the theme of brain circulation. The global movement of talented researchers has been viewed previously via the more negative concept of brain drain. Brain drain implies a one-way movement of talent from the developing world to research powerhouse nations; brain circulation, however, reflects the circular aspects of this movement, which are often beneficial on both sides.

Attracting talent in a global academic world: How emerging research universities can benefit from brain circulation

By Jamil Salmi, Global Tertiary Education Expert

Though academic mobility has been a defining element of higher education from its beginnings, it has now reached unprecedented levels, and is likely to continue growing as countries and tertiary education institutions compete for the most talented professionals. As the examples in this article illustrate, a notable selection of universities in emerging economies have succeeded in building their teaching and research capacity by relying extensively on their ability to lure and keep foreign academics, often through directed recruitment from their diasporas.



China: Building an innovation talent program system and facing global competition in a knowledge economy

By Yu Wei and Zhaojun Sun, Peking University

China is experiencing a serious shortage of high-level innovation talent, which presents a challenge to current efforts to develop the knowledge economy and build an innovation-oriented country. Efforts are underway to recruit special talents from among the 200,000 Chinese citizens estimated to be working in major developed countries after completing their overseas studies.

UK study reveals that internationally mobile researchers are significantly more productive

By Andrew Plume, Elsevier

The International Comparative Performance of the UK Research Base: 2011 report assessed the performance of the UK's research base. It found that UK researchers generate more articles per researcher, more citations per researcher, and more usage per article authored, and that the researchers' mobility was a key factor.

US research enterprise powered by international postdocs

With Keith Micoli, New York University Langone Medical Center

The Academic Executive Brief interviews Keith Micoli, Postdoctoral Program Director at New York University Langone Medical Center and former chair of the National Postdoctoral Association. Micoli reflects on the importance of postdocs to the US research enterprise, the largely international nature of the position, and the importance of making the postdoc an attractive career option.