TEAM SCIENCE

Volume 2, Issue 2 – 2012

In our new issue, academic leaders around the globe share their knowledge of and experience with team science. Authors from the United States, Germany, Malaysia, and India explore team science in terms of institutional and national influence, team science tools and leadership, team formation and research networking systems.



Ambitious and agile: The University of Bremen’s institutional strategy for advancing research strengths at a mid-sized university

By Rolf Drechsler and Achim Wiesner, University of Bremen

The University of Bremen produces internationally competitive research, ranking especially high in volume of third-party funding for that research. Bremen has been notably boosted in its development by its capacity for internal cooperation and communication.

Guidance for team science leaders: Tools you can use

By Holly J. Falk-Krzesinski, Elsevier

The author explores recent findings about team assembly and composition, as well as trust and communication, and offers related tools leaders can use to implement effective practices in team science.

The Malaysian experience: A new approach in managing multi-disciplinary research projects

By Mohd Jailani Mohd Nor, Universiti Teknikal Malaysia Melaka

Realizing that R&D excellence cannot happen in bits and pieces, the Ministry of Higher Education has launched a comprehensive initiative to create synergistic efforts in promoting R&D excellence throughout Malaysia. To secure the new incentives, all parties interested in conducting research in Malaysia, including university administrators, research offices, research groups and individual researchers, must now work together in multi-disciplinary and multi-institutional teams.



Big Science teams built on research discovery and networking systems

By Mike Conlon, University of Florida and Kristi L. Holmes, Washington University in St. Louis

In modern science, like never before, it often takes a top-notch team to maximize the discovery process and compete effectively for essential funding opportunities. Forming a world-class team requires a rich and varied type of research discovery, one in which member scientists have both a broad and deep awareness of what is going on in their discipline. To fully understand the 21st Century landscape of science, we now need networks to better collect, observe, disseminate, and evaluate what is going on in science. One such interdisciplinary network is VIVO, which comprises more than 100 institutions representing more than 1 million scholars and support staff across more than 25 countries.

Science at the interface: UoH’s quest for innovation and excellence

By Ram Ramaswamy, University of Hyderabad

Many academic leaders believe that the most exciting developments of any given field lie along its boundaries with other disciplines. This article describes the various multidisciplinary centers established by the University of Hyderabad after it received a grant of approximately US $6 million to focus research in Interfacial Studies. Making faculty members think more about the ways in which disciplines can mesh has encouraged UoH colleagues to venture into exciting and unexplored regions of the academic landscape.